Home  |  All Districts  |  About Us  |  Feedback  |  Mail | |    |  Admin  |  Logout
other districts in region
district related
 
news & current affairs
 
 
other links
 
related websites
 

housing


A sample survey of houses was conducted between the dates of 19th January until the 22nd February 2006. This survey was undertaken by a Canadian intern through a partnership between the NALAG and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM). The communities there were sampled and analysed included Juansa, Kyekyebiase, Nyaboo, Obenimase, and Patriensa. The sample survey may be applicable to other communities within the Municipality.

The inventory of houses in the database numbers to 565 houses.  While this is not a complete inventory of all the houses in the five communities, the surveys recorded the house numbers of all the houses and therefore the remaining houses can be targeted systematically. 

Physical Characteristics
The most common dwellings in the surveyed communities are compound and self-contained cement/sandcrete houses with metal sheet roofing.  As illustrated in figure 1, self-contained and compound houses consist of a combined 87% of the houses in these communities. Examining each of the communities independently, compound housing is the most common dwelling type in each of the communities, except Nyaboo.  However, as Table below shows, the sample size for Nyaboo was small (41 houses), and difference of 16 self-contained, compared with 15 compound houses is insignificant.   

Examining each of the communities independently, compound housing is the most common dwelling type in each of the communities, except Nyaboo.  However, as Table below shows, the sample size for Nyaboo was small (41 houses), and difference of 16 self-contained, compared with 15 compound houses is insignificant.   As exhibited in Table below, the predominant wall material is cement/sandcrete in all the communities, with a fair number of mud houses and brick houses. Almost all the houses (96%) are roofed with metal sheets, with a few insignificant number of houses with cement/concrete, asbestos, mud, roofing tile, thatch, and wood roofs.

As depicted in Table, the condition of the houses varies across communities.  Most of the houses are in need of minor or major repairs.  Juansa and Kyekyebiase have a very low number of houses in good condition (7.0% and 5.4%), while Nyaboo and Patriensa have a greater number in good condition (25.0% and 21.8%).  Significantly, Juansa and Obenimase have high percentages of houses in need of major repairs (39.8% and 40.9%). On average, the houses in these communities have 4.8 rooms (excluding kitchens and washrooms), with two-room houses being the most common number of rooms.

Facilities
Electricity is available in all the communities, with just over 40% of the houses having electricity.  In Kyekyebiase, the percentage is significantly lower, with only 29.6% of houses having electricity. As the Table shows, more than half of the houses in the communities do not have toilet facilities and therefore must rely on public toilets or practice free-range defecation/urination.  This has serious implications for public health and sanitation.  In particular, Patriensa has only 2 functional public KVIPs, which is highly inadequate if over 50% of the population relies on this.  In Nyaboo, the situation appears to be a bit better, with only 30% of houses without toilet facilities; however, this community has only one public toilet facility.

Very few houses have the more advanced technology toilet facilities such as water closets, vault chambers, bio-gas latrines, and aqua privies.  Of the houses that have toilet facilities, KVIPs are the most prominent in Juansa, Kyekyebiase, and Patriensa, while the less unhygienic pit latrines are most common in Nyaboo  and Obenimase.

For tables refer to pdf file attached

 




 view links:

Relevant District Data

 Also in this district
© 2006. A Public - Private Partnership Programme between Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development and Maks Publications & Media Services